Category Archives: Italy

Bologna Italy CAtholic Pilgrimmage

Bologna, Italy – Pilgrimage to the Sanctuary of the Madonna di San Luca

Bologna Italy Catholic Pilgrimmage

I should begin by making it clear that I’m not a Catholic. I believe in the God that makes it possible for me to worship with all of the people of the world, so when I found out that there was a famous pilgrimage in Bologna, Italy I determined to make the pilgrimmage since I was already in Bologna as a guest of Emilia-Romagna Tourism.

The Sanctuary of the Madonna di San Luca is a destination for pilgrims from all over the world and while I was in Bologna primarily to worship the food and architecture, I decided to make the trek to the magnificent sanctuary which sits atop the Guardia Hill and serves as the most prominent landmark in the beautiful city of Bologna.

Here is a complete list of  Hotels in Bologna, Italy – because even pilgrims need a place to sleep! (Complete and up to date reviews and pricing)

Bologna is remarkable for many reasons, not the least of which is ‘the people’s umbrella’ which consists of more than 53 kilometers of covered walkways which developed from the medieval habit of extending the first floor of houses out over the sidewalk. The extensions were then supported with wooden beams and stone – and eventually, they became public space within the city. The result is that people in Bologna need not carry an umbrella even in the most violent downpour because they can get just about everywhere without stepping out from under the porticos. While there are many famous portico walks, the longest of them is the trek to the Sanctuary of the Madonna di San Luca.

This amazingly long and uninterrupted portico stretches from Porto Saragozza where you will find the Museum of the Beata Virgine di San Luca. The towers and crenalated porticos which house the museum dates back to the 13th century but had famous design work done on it by the noted 19th century architect Giuseppe Mengoni.

Virgin of Saint LukeFrom Porto Saragozza pilgrims remove their shoes and begin the 3,796 meter (about 2 1/2 miles) climb up the longest uninterrupted portico in the world.  The portico has been in place since 1433 and each year the famous artifact, which is a Byzantine portrait of Madonna and Child, is carried in procession from the Sanctuary, down the hill, and then back up. The porticos were designed by Gian Giacomo Monti and later continued by Carlo Franceso Dotti and others. The section completed by Dotti is perhaps the most amazing in terms of architectural values as it utilizes a huge number of perspectives and vanishing points which enhance the feeling of awe as the pilgrims climb the steepest sections.

While I wasn’t there for the procession, there were still hundreds of pilgrims marching shoeless up the hill and stopping along the way to say prayers, make signs of the cross, and in some cases weep. There were Malaysian nuns, South American groups, American devotees, and Chinese catholics marching and chanting side by side.

The reason is that Byzantine portrait which is said to be the work of the famous evangelist St. Luke, author of the Gospel of St. Luke in the new testament. Interestingly, he is credited as being the first to paint icons of the Virgin and Child. The effigy is the patron saint of Bologna. Upon reaching the top, the Sanctuary opens up in a wonderous display of outdoor Baroque architecture that is both beautiful and adds to the sense of wonder before entering the sanctuary.

I arrived, with the pilgrims just before Mass was to begin. As I said, I’m not Catholic, but when I saw nuns tuning up guitars and felt the hushed electricity of the pilgrims as they began to sit, I decided to stay for Catholic Mass, which was a first for me. I can hardly imagine a more serene or exciting setting and while I didn’t understand the words, I felt the tears of the old Italian couple next to me and afterwards joined the true believers as they wound through the sanctuary to come for a closer look at the Madonna and Child.

The sanctuary itself was also re-designed and enlarged by Dotti and carries a very solemn and profound energy. I found it very interesting to be in Italy, looking at a painting brought from Constantinople (Istanbul) a thousand years before listening to prayers in a language that wasn’t my own after traversing 666 arches (how odd they should use that number) to reach it with hundreds of barefoot pilgrims.

I offered my prayers to God asking that my own wife and child be kept safe while I was away from them and stepped out to enjoy the beautiful walk back down into Bologna – I was fortunate in that on the day of my pilgrimage, the sun was shining brightly.

Festivals of Bergamo

Bergamo – Italian City of Festivals

Bergamo, Italy is a rich tapestry of trade roads, history, art, and incredible festivals. The city, home to the artist Caravaggio (who not surprisingly is honored in a festival each Autumn) and the furthest outpost of Venice’s once mighty domain sits at the base of the Alps and historically served as a way point for goods from the Adriatic on their way to central Europe, Milan, and thence to Western Europe.

Festivals of BergamoWith it’s mighty symbol of trade, the Sentierone, it’s natural that this city should still function as a trading crossroads for not only Europe but for the world. And, as a bonus – some wonderful festivals come with that.

The locals will tell you that the city’s flag colors were chosen because of the dish for which the city is well known. Polenta. Made from stone ground Maize and cooked in copper pots you can find it everywhere. The flag – the golden yellow and the red (to represent wine, of course) – the flag flies above every festival the city hosts.

The festivals are remarkable in their diversity. From the late October Cortopotere Short Film Festival which has been running for 12 years now and brings film makers from all around the world to the nearly decade old Bergamoscienza Festival which has talks, workshops, shows, and round table discussions with Nobel Prize winners.

Bergamo flower festivalThe City of Bergamo International Organ Festival is concerned with the instrument housed in the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore and brings some of the greatest organ talent in the world to showcase this amazing instrument. Another festival centered around instruments is the Alfredo Piatti International Cello Festival which offers concerts from well known Cellists for the public.

The International Early Music Festival is another festival dedicated to the Organ – this time with the works of Bach. And of course there is the Bergamo International Jazz Festival.

The Gaetano Donizetti Music Festival of Bergamo takes place at the Donizetti Theatre and is a world renowned Opera festival. The Gianni and Fausto Rdici Trophy is an event that combines music and another great love of Bergamo – skiing!

Festival of Bergamo MusicThe Bergamo International marathon takes place each September and brings runners from around the globe to compete on the incredibly scenic course. The Valgoglio Vertical is a high altitude race through the Alps!

Alta Quota which means high altitude is a trade fair which is all about the mountains – literally. The Fiera Campionaria is a traditional trade fair which goes back more than three decades and brings ever growing numbers of visitors to the city. It’s not to be confused with the Mercantanti in Fiera international food market/trade fair which has been going strong for ten years and allows Bergamask to enjoy food from all over the world. Every continent (except Antarctica) was represented.

Villages, Castles, and Palaces in Celebration is a festival which highlights the many beautiful places in the Bergamo province and offers gastonomic, musical, and visual delights for attendees. Another festival honors the beatification of Pope John XXIII with fireworks, religious icons, music, worship, and more.

On a different note is the Presente Prossimo Festival Dei Narratori Italiani which is an Italian Presenters Festival in the Serio Valley that included writers workshops, a writing conference, and of course, lots of presenting.

Bergamo food and wine festivalThose who love wine will find plenty of wine festivals in Bergamo from the “International Competition Emotions from the World: Merlot and Cabernet Together” to the Polenta Tragna Feast which always has plenty of wine and the traditional Bergamask meal.

And a furniture and furnishing accessories trade fair is held each November as well.

One thing is certain – if you go to Bergamo – you are almost certain to find at least one festival going on and don’t be surprised if you find many!

Hotels in Bergamo, Milan, or Orio al Serio

Bergamo Hotels
Milan Hotels
Orio al Serio Hotels

About Bergamo, Milan, and Italy

Lonely Planet: The Italian Lakes Guide
Bergamo: The History, The Art
Eyewitness Travel: Milan and the Lakes
Frommers Northern Italy

Castles of Italy

Ferrara, Italy – From Castello Estense to Cappellacci di Zucca

Ferrara, ItalyFerrara, Italy is well off the beaten path of most visitor’s travel plans when they come to Italy – and that contributes to exactly why you should take the time to stop in this charming cobble-stoned Northern Italian town.

More than just having the chance to enjoy a medieval Gothic town including a rather beautiful duomo (cathedral) and plenty of delicious cuisine – the big draw to Ferrara is being able to explore the massive Castello Estense which sits, surrounded by a story book moat with drawbridge, right in the center of this charming little town.

Ferrara owes it’s charms to the architect Biaggio Rosetti and his patron, Ercole d’Este who was forward thinking enough to hire him and ask that he fuse the old and the new into Italy’s first modern town. Ferrara is a UNESCO world heritage city.

Ferrara, Lucretia BorgiaFor those who are interested in history or famous persons (or who enjoy watching the series The Borgias) the son of Ercole d’Este was Alfonso, the final husband of Lucretzia Borgia. Lucretzia is actually buried in Ferrara.

Castello Estense was built first in 1384 and then later modernized during the reigns of Ercole and Alfonso.  Modernization continued until the 19th century – but because of the size and effectiveness of the initial design, the castle remains a wonderful example of Renaissance architecture with elements of the Gothic and Medeivil.

Within the castle, much is as you would expect, massive kitchens, dungeons, hidden twisted passages – but there are a few gems hidden away.   For example, one doesn’t expect to find an orange grove on the roof of a tower – but here there is one.

Castello d'EstenseThe Ducal Chapel is equally surprising, not for it’s ornamentation, but rather for it’s lack of frescoes and decoration which is easily contrasted with the rich frescoes and ornamentation of the Chamber of Dawn just a bit further.  The surprise here are the massive mirrors which haven’t been added so tourists can see the ceilings easier, they were a part of the original design! In fact, this room (and the two following) were known as The Mirror Suite. Slightly further on the nude Greek figures wrestling on the ceiling are the defining feature of the Hall of Games.

View from Italian CastleWhile there is much more, the truth is that exploring this castle needs to be done in leisure and in person for maximum enjoyment. Once you’ve done that, my suggestion is that you head out into Ferrara, hire a bicycle, and then dig into the local culinary specialty cappellacci di zucca which is  a round pasta stuffed with pumpkin and served with al burro e salvia – or butter and sage.

One thing is for certain, you won’t be disappointed with a visit to Ferrara, Italy.

Ferrara Resources:

Hotels in Ferrara
Dukes and Poets in Ferrara
Ercole d’Este and the Invention of the Ducal Capital
The Life and Times of Lucrezia Borgia