Advertisements

Vagobond in Bulgaria – Part 1 – Sofia Tourist Sites

During the time I traveled in Sofia, I managed to see and do a huge number of things. I can’t fit it all in one, two, or even three posts. To sum up, let me just say that Sofia was a great place for me to visit. On the one hand that’s cool, but on the other, when the first act of a play is awesome, it makes the rest a bit harder to appreciate.

I mentioned before that one of the cool coincidence’s about my host in Sofia was that he had a website and magazine called Vagabond. In fact, that’s a bit of a lie. It turns out that he used to work and is still associated and friends with Vagabond Magazine. Tim, left Vagabond to start his own company, Intercontinental Recruiting, which finds Bulgariand and other Eastern Europeans jobs in Western countries.

Tim and I hit it off immediately.

Communist Stadium Bulgaria
Apparently the communists liked Tennis a lot.
First of all, he had me watch the video about Sofia, then we went for a long walk through communist parks, into a communist hotel, and past all the great sites we’d seen in the video. Along the way, we mostly ignored the sites and talked about what had brought us away from the USA, how we liked the countries we lived in, what we wanted from life, and how cool it was to actually see the old communist stuff. I’ll do separate posts about statues and parks and the various churches and places of worship in Sofia, Bulgaria later.

Here is some stuff that is already written over at WikiTravel. The pictures are from Tim and my walk.

Sofia is one of the oldest cities in Europe with ruins spread across the city center. It was founded because of the quality of its mineral waters. In the city alone there are 7 independent mineral water springs. Bulgaria hot springsOne of the springs is in the central area of the city and is accessible for everybody – cross the square behind the mosque, next to TSUM (the intersection of Iskar and Ekzarh Yosif streets).

In the administrative center of Sofia the streets are covered with a specific yellow pavement. It was laid in the beginning of the 20th century and were a present to the Bulgarian Tsar Ferdinand for his wedding from the Austria-Hungarian royal family.

* National Assembly of Bulgaria, 2 Narodno Sabranie Sq., ? +359 2 939 39 (infocenter@parliament.bg, fax: +359 2 981 31 31), . edit

Sofia University in Bulgaria* Sofia University, 15 Tsar Osvoboditel Blvd., ? +359 2 9308 (fax: +359 2 946 02 55), . edit

* Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1 15 November Str., ? +359 2 979 53 33 (fax: +359 2 981 72 62), . edit

 Ivan Vazov National Theatre in Bulgaria, Sofia * Ivan Vazov National Theatre, 5 Dyakon Ignatii Str., ? +359 2 811 92 19 (info@nationaltheatre.bg, fax: +359 2 987 70 66), . edit

* SS. Cyril and Methodius National Library, 88 Vasil Levski Str., ? + 359 2 988 28 11 (fax: + 359 2 843 54 95), . 08:30 to 20:30. edit

* National Palace of Culture, 1 Bulgaria Sq., ? +359 2 916 63 00 (fax: +359 2 865 70 53), . The biggest congress center in the Balkans (a massive monolithic communist-style building). If asking for directions, ask for NDK (en-de-ka), as most Bulgarians refer to it by this acronym. edit

* Central Military Club. It`s a multi-purpose monument of culture building in the city center

Back at his place we had a delicious Bulgarian meal of chicken and potatoes and drank a bit of bulgarian wine with Bulgarian friends. I got to learn about some Bulgarian traditions, Bulgarian monsters, and Bulgarian customs.

The next day I wandered

Advertisements

Vago Damitio

Mr. Damitio  (@vagodamitio) is the Editor-in-Chief for Vagobond. Life is good. You can also find him on Google+ and at Facebook

%d bloggers like this: