Tim Ferriss

Tim Ferriss: Amazing Vagabond

Tim FerrissIn 2007 while  hiking in Hawaii, my friend Leo was asking me questions about my book Rough Living: Tips and Tales of a Vagabond. When I told him it was about how to live without being a wage-slave, he said “So you’re like Tim Ferriss, the guy who wrote the the 4-Hour Work-Week.”

“The what?” I asked. Yeah. I was apparently the last one to hear about Tim. While I wish I could have said “Yeah, I’m just like Tim Ferriss” – it isn’t even close to the truth.  Check out his mini-bio from The Huffington Post:

Serial entrepreneur and ultra-vagabond Timothy Ferriss has been featured in The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler, Maxim, and other media. He is a guest lecturer at Princeton University in High-tech Entrepreneurship and The 4-Hour Workweek (Crown/Random House) is his debut book on ideal lifestyle design. He speaks five languages, runs a multinational firm from wireless locations worldwide, and has been a world-record holder in tango, a national champion in Chinese kickboxing, and an actor on a hit television series in Hong Kong. He is 32 years old.

Let’s see – world records, all those magazines, best sellers, five languages, owner of a multi-national firm, actor, kickboxing champ? Yeah…none of that is me. I wish. By the way, the Huffpo bio is out of date because Tim has now written two more best sellers – The 4-Hour Body and The 4-Hour Chef  (You can read my review of The 4-Hour Chef here). Also, his page at wikipedia  says he speaks six languages now.

Holy shit! Yeah, I admit it. I wish I had the success record of Tim Ferriss.  If you’ve never heard of Tim, a good place to start is by following him on Twitter. (@tferriss).

The truth is, so much has been written about Ferriss that it would be very difficult for me to add anything new.  I’m going to provide another quote, this time from the New Yorker.

Every generation gets the self-help guru that it deserves. In 1937, at the height of the Depression, Napoleon Hill wrote “Think and Grow Rich,” which claimed to distill the principles that had made Andrew Carnegie so wealthy. “The Power of Positive Thinking,” by Norman Vincent Peale, which was published in 1952, advised readers that techniques such as “a mind-emptying at least twice a day” would lead to success. By the seventies, Werner Erhard and est promised material wealth through spiritual enlightenment. The eighties and nineties saw management-consultancy maxims married with New Age thinking, with books such as Stephen Covey’s “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.” In the past decade or so, there has been a rise in books such as “Who Moved My Cheese?,” by Spencer Johnson, which promise to help readers maximize their professional potential in an era of unpredictable workplaces.  

Ferriss’s books appeal to those for whom cheese, per se, has ceased to have any allure. “This book is not about finding your ‘dream job,’ ” Ferriss writes in “The 4-Hour Workweek.” “I will take it as a given that, for most people, somewhere between six and seven billion of them, the perfect job is the one that takes the least time.” But Ferriss doesn’t recommend idleness. Rather, he prescribes a kind of hyperkinetic entrepreneurialism of the body and soul, with every man his own life coach, angel investor, Web master, personal trainer, and pharmaceutical test subject. One’s body can become one’s own laboratory: with “a few tweaks,” Ferriss suggests, its performance can be maximally enhanced—just as in the movie “Limitless,” but without the nasty withdrawal symptoms.

Where in the world did this guy come from?

Ferriss comes from the Hampton’s, that part of New York where the richest of the rich spend their leisure time. He wasn’t however, the son of a billionaire. His father sold real estate and his mother worked as a physical therapist – certainly he wasn’t a poor kid, but according to him, he wasn’t a rich one either. He attended the prestigious St. Paul’s boarding school and had a year of studying abroad in Japan. After that, he went on to study at Princeton before moving to Silicon Valley and starting his own vitamin supplement company.

Along the way, he hacked his way into winning kick boxing championships, world records in Tango, and learning all those languages. The secret? He looks for the loopholes. According to Ferriss, he has been doing that his whole life. It probably helped that he found a great mentor: Jack Canfield author of the Chicken Soup for …. books.

He’s not without controversy. Read his reviews on Amazon and you will come across the words huckster, liar, and con-man. He’s been compared to PT Barnum and is often referred to as the world’s #1 self promoter. There’s not doubt about the last one and as for the rest, there are always haters when a person finds incredible success as he has done. (Unless you are Chris Guillebeau). No one can argue that Ferris has been unsuccessful.

This last is from the bio page on his blog, which, I recommend you read:

Tim has amassed a diverse (and certainly odd) roster of experiences:

  • Princeton University guest lecturer in High-Tech Entrepreneurship and Electrical Engineering
  • Finance and Entrepreneurship advisor at Singularity University at NASA Ames, co-founded by Peter Diamandis and Ray Kurzweil.
  • First American in history to hold a Guinness World Record in tango
  • Speaker of 5 languages 
  • National Chinese kickboxing champion
  • Horseback archer (yabusame) in Nikko, Japan
  • 2009 Henry Crown Fellow at the Aspen Institute
  • Political asylum researcher
  • MTV breakdancer in Taiwan
  • Hurling competitor in Ireland
  • Wired Magazine’s “Greatest Self-Promoter of 2008?

Tim received his BA from Princeton University in 2000, where he studied in the Neuroscience and East Asian Studies departments. He developed his nonfiction writing with Pulitzer Prize winner John McPhee and formed his life philosophies under Nobel Prize winner Kenzaburo Oe.

I think back to Leo asking if I was like Tim Ferriss. Nope. Not at all. Tim Ferriss is like nobody else in this world, and that, is exactly what we do have in common.

 

Udaivilas Udaipur

Best Hotel in the World- Oberoi Udaivilas in Udaipu, India

by Nishant Churuthi

What is the world’s nicest hotel? There may be some argument about it, but guest writer Nishant Churuthi is pretty sure he has found the best hotel in the world.  (To see more, read reviews, or book a room in this magnificent hotel, click here)

There are many ways by which a hotel can be judged, and one of the more popular ways is by rating hotels with stars, ranging from one star, which means that the hotel is simply a tourist hotel, to 5 stars, which means the hotel is a super luxury one. Though there is no single global classification, the most agreed upon rating is the star system.

Also, though officially there are no hotels in the world rated higher than 5, every now and then we see a hotel advertising to be a 7 star one. There is no way to check the authenticity of such claims, apart from visiting the hotel yourself and seeing if it really deserves such a rating. All said, however, every now and then we come across such a hotel that you would think deserves more than even 7 stars.

Udaivilas Udaipur8 stars? Maybe, but it’s not official. One such hotel that its visitors have constantly placed in the “above 5 stars” category is the Oberoi Udaivilas, located int he beautiful city of Udaipur, Rajasthan, India.

The city of Udaipur is one of the most beautiful ones in India, and was voted the best city in the world by Travel + Leisure, USA in its 2009 Readers’ Poll. It is a city of lakes and palaces. Not just normal palaces. Magnificent ones. Reflecting the true glory of the place, the Oberoi Udaivilas is indeed a majestic hotel, and does justice to its praise of deserving 8 stars. At first glance, the hotel itself seems to be a palace. Every inch of the hotel showcases the rich Indian tradition, and the courtyards, fountains, pools and gardens all bear testimony.

Once you enter the hotel, you no longer will believe that this hotel actually exists in the 21st century, it’s so surreal. best hotel in the worldEach and every thing, right from the hand painted domes, to the intricately carved doorways, has been crafted with love and perfection that leaves no doubt in your mind regarding the royalness of the place.

The hotel is accessed by traveling by boat through Lake Pichola, and the ride itself will leave you spellbound. Each visitor is then treated to the ceremonial welcome at the entrance. The Oberoi Uaivilas has rooms to suit all needs. Rooms that open to private pools are available. All rooms feature exquisite decorations and the glory of the erstwhile kingdoms of India is regaled in its entire splendor at the Oberoi Udaivilas.

All kinds of international cuisines are available, and the specialty is the traditional local Rajasthan cuisine, which is prepared by the best chefs in the country.

The hotel has its own luxurious spa, which overlooks the Lake and is a heaven in itself. World class trained therapists provide your body with all the relaxation it needs and you are sure to feel exhilarated and rejuvenated to the fullest.

With impeccable service, the Oberoi Udaivilas truly puts the phrase “there’s never too much luxury”, to the ultimate test. If there is heaven on earth, this is it and we should all get the chance to stay there, at least once in a lifetime.

Nishant Churuthi is a writer and scholar in Udaipur, India. He enjoys spending time with his family, writing, and seeing the many splendors which his country offers.

 

Morning Business in Rural Mrorocco

Morning Business in Rural Morocco

Morning Business in Rural Mrorocco

Morning Business in Rural Morocco

Actually, the clothes might seem to tell you this is morning in rural Morocco, but in fact, it could be any time of the day since Arab and Berber women tend to wear pajamas and bathrobes day and night. The only reason you might guess this is morning is the light and the tired look on the girl’s face as she buys coffee for the morning breakfast from the lady with the cart.

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