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Italian Road Trip: How to Eat Your Way Through Calabria

Living in a city with excellent public transport, it can be easy to forget that some places just aren’t do-able without a car. Italy has a decent national rail system but, practically speaking, it only really connects the major urban centres. The places we wanted to explore were typically provincial, off the beaten track; everyone we know who’s been to Italy comes back raving about the food, and it’s no secret that Italian cuisine is regionally distinctive. In fact it can even vary from one town to the next, let alone between broader regions, and our most trusted sources – namely friends, and favourite bloggers like My Bella Vita, were adamant that, unless you have really good cycling stamina, regional Italy can only be explored by car.

Thus our Italian road trip was conceived. One of the chief benefits of travelling by car is you’re not strictly stuck to one route or itinerary – beyond “fly in here” and “return flight from here”, there’s a great deal of freedom in it. So we plotted a general course and left plenty of leeway for rabbiting off up mountainsides to follow up local recommendations, and generally wandering off course to follow our noses.

Having decided to start in the south and work our way north, we fly in to Palermo in Sicily (three-ish hours from Gatwick, shockingly cheap – how are they funding these air-traffic concessions?!) to explore Sicily for a couple of days before heading to Messina and catching the ferry across the Straits to Villa San Giovanni on the Italian mainland.

Reggio Calabria. Commons image by Alfie Ianni.

Bergamotto Cake in Reggio Calabria

Heading briefly south along the coastal road, we first come to Reggio Calabria, the largest city in the region and reputedly the second oldest city in Italy. This area is famous for growing 80% of the world’s bergamot, the aromatic citrus fruit that flavours Earl Grey tea and Turkish Delight. Susumelle al Bergamotto is a delicious, light cake that is made with honey and at first glance resembles a flattened iced doughnut, but is much cakier with a more sophisticated flavour.

 

Anchovy Pasta in Melito de Porto Salvo

Anchovies are common in these coastal waters, and make a cheap, healthy and delicious meal when prepared with garlic, olive oil and fresh pasta. From Melito, we head inland to explore the gorgeous mountains of Aspromonte National Park. This region has an ancient history and interesting wildlife, including peregrine falcons and golden eagles. It’s easy to find a great meal here, with homemade pasta dishes prepared to old family recipes available in the small villages en route.

Village in Aspromonte National Park. Commons image by PD-Self

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Vago Damitio

Mr. Damitio  (@vagodamitio) is the Editor-in-Chief for Vagobond. Life is good. You can also find him on Google+ and at Facebook

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