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Introduction to the Oregon Coast

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Out of all the places in the world – we’ve chosen to live on the Oregon Coast.  This 363 mile (584 km) stretch of mostly undeveloped land on the Pacific Ocean offers long sandy beaches, stunning wild shorelines, and more than a few interesting roadside attractions. What it does not offer – is warm ocean to swim in – which is, perhaps the reason we will eventually leave for warmer climates…but only time will tell.

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We live in the ‘undiscovered’ city of Reedsport – a bit of a backwater slightly inland from the shore and so a few degrees warmer, less foggy, and slightly less rainy in the winter.  Our town has about 3000 people in it and lies directly between Coos Bay to the south (the largest city on the Oregon Coast with 16,000 residents) and the rather hip town of Florence to the north (Florence has book festivals, a great waterfront, and the best indy cinema on the coast). We travel to both cities frequently because Reedsport has only two small grocery stores, a new brewery, and not much else in terms of shopping or entertainment.

The Astoria Column
The Astoria Column

The Oregon Coast is broken up into three sections – the North Coast which goes from Astoria to Lincoln City, the Central Coast which goes from Newport to Florence, and the South Coast which goes from Reedsport to the California border.  Each section offers unique experience, though, to be honest – there are a few things quite notably lacking such as places you can have a beer and look at the ocean from a deck. Oregon is strange in this way…we are extremely backward when it comes to some simple amenities. I’ve grown used to it, but one of the complaints I quite frequently hear from visitors to the Oregon Coast is about how bad our service in restaurants is…you are lucky if someone says hello when you go in and it’s not rare to have to ask for silverware.  Every place has it’s idiosyncrasies…

Oregon Beaches
Oregon Beaches

One of the beauties of Oregon law is the Beach Bill of 1967 which grants free beach access to everyone. You may have to pay for parking, but you won’t have to pay for the beach here. Just bring your jacket or wetsuit.

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We live (like most people on the Oregon Coast) about a minute from Hwy 101 which traverses the entire state from North to South. My sister lives less than a mile from Hwy 101 in the Bay Area…we  say to get from her house to mine she just turns right on 101 and then drives for 10 hours before turning left onto our street.  Along Hwy 101 in Oregon there are over 80 state parks. Along the way there are beaches, lighthouses, the Oregon Dunes, surf breaks, and more than a little wildlife including bears, elk, deer, beavers, birds, salmon, steelhead, and more.

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The history of the Oregon Coast stretches from indigenous people arriving in pre-history to the arrival of Lewis and Clark in the early  1800s to the only attack on the mainland USA in World War II when a Japanese midget submarine bombed the Oregon shoreline in an unsuccessful attempt at starting huge forest fires. Today there are great roadside attractions like the Dinosaur park in the south, the Tillamook Cheese Factory, and the Sea Lion Caves just north of Florence.

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There is a lot to see here…we’ve been exploring for three years now…and we are only getting started.

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Vago Damitio

Damitio  (@vagodamitio) is the Editor-in-Chief for Vagobond. Life is good. You can also find him on Google+ and at Facebook

4 thoughts on “Introduction to the Oregon Coast

  • October 4, 2016 at 8:11 am
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    “founded a successful online travel magazine” … and still posting photos rotated 90 degrees anticlockwise? Hmm …

  • October 5, 2016 at 6:52 pm
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    Alright, you’re better than me. I hope that makes you feel good. I feel the same for some reason. Thanks for your snark, everyone who reads it knows you are awesome because of it.

  • October 5, 2016 at 6:55 pm
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    The funny thing is, all snark aside, when I rotate them – they show up on every browser I look at it on as being 90 sideways…so when I post them sideways, they look rightside up in Safari, Chrome, and Opera (but not Firefox, it turnes out) using a variety of OS – my assumption (perhaps incorrect) was that WordPress has developed the ability to determine horizon and post photos right side up…it does bear looking into and if you have the answer, it would show you are more than just one of 7 billion snide remarkers…

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