Category Archives: Expat life

Asian Waterfalls

Jobs for Vagabonds – Get Paid to Travel the World

Who says freelancing isn’t for you? I think the first thing you should do is take the time to read my latest e-book All there Is To It, Is To Do It – Finding Your Passion Income
.

If you want to start looking for another way to travel and work for the man, there are options available for you. And many of them involve working for a man (or woman) that might just be very cool and good to you.

Jobs for Travelers
Maybe you want to travel the world burning things?

With so many people out of work, looking for work, or between jobs there are plenty of folks right now that have the greatest opportunity they will ever have to really live their lives and do something.

Maybe now is the right time to spend a few months or even years living and working overseas. In fact, living and working in another country is the best way to really learn about different cultures. You end up working with and living among people instead of just seeing them from a tour bus.

Flowers on World Travel
The beauty of Travel is Visible Everywhere

Most of these jobs won’t make you wealthy, they won’t pay enough to pay back your student loans, but they just might make your life feel fulfilling, make your soul sing, and give you a bigger and better world view.

It’s not easy to find work overseas, but you can do it and now might be the best time you will ever have to see what it’s really like to live in a foreign culture. World travel is calling…will you answer the phone?

Do you have any idea how many people half a billion are? That’s 500 million and that is the number of Chinese who are studying English right now. Most of them don’t have native speaking teachers but they want them. The same goes for Indonesia, Spain, Morocco, Germany, and just about every other non-English speaking country in the world.

What do you need? Usually you need at least a bachelors degree. For many companies that is enough and they will pay for your housing, visa, and even your flight to and from their countries. To get an idea of the jobs available have a look at ESLcafe.com. I’ve been doing this in Morocco for nearly a year and you can do it too. In fact, I just might do it again somewhere else in the near future. Teaching is a total joy.Find out more by clicking on the i to i icon below.

Those wanting to find service jobs can. If you want to go about things the legal way with a work permit and visa you should look into companies such as BUNAC (British Universities North America Club) and CIEE (just google them) which will assist for you for around $300 to work in Australia, the UK, New Zealand, Canada or Ireland. You can work in restaurants, pick fruit, or do just about anything your heart desires.

Of course if you want to do it the good old fashioned way, just get a one way ticket and take a kick ass resume with you. It’s not hard to find employers that will hire you illegally. Of course you probably can’t expect a great salary this way either.

Asian Waterfalls
You can travel to places like this and get paid for it.

And then there are the guiding jobs, cruise ship jobs, sales jobs, and airline jobs which don’t usually pay as well as sedentary jobs in your home country, but pay off with the chance to spend significant amounts of time in foreign climes.

So, if you want a job or you want to leave your country, don’t wait. Start looking now.

retire in Hawaii

Finding the Cheapest (and Best) Places to Retire

I’m only 42 and retirement might seem like it’s a long ways away, but let’s face it – I’m already retired and I’ll probably never have the luxury of stopping working. But that’s me –

The truth is, for most people retirement seems like it’s far away and then whammo – it’s on you and you don’t know how it came so fast. Unfortunately, the horrible truth for most people is that when the time comes, they find that they have to downsize and lighten the load because social security, 401ks, and retirement funds never seem to be as much as you expected and – let’s be honest here – life is getting more expensive all the time.

It might seem odd, that a travel blog would be delving into the best places to retire, but in truth – that’s sort of what started this blog in the first place.  I realized that I could either keep slaving away in the corporate world or I could find a place more affordable and conducive to the lifestyle I desired. It’s always been about finding the best place to retire for me.

No matter where you retire, it’s always a good Idea to make sure you will able to retire comfortably. Many of us (especially those in the their mid-20’s and 30’s neglect the idea that one day we will have to rely on the money we’re putting away now. That’s where companies like Suncorp Super and the like come in, who can help you consolidate and manage your retirement fund so when your do retire, you can travel the world.

My own search has led me to some incredible places and not surprisingly, I always find a few retirees wherever I go. Here is a short list of some of the best retirement places I’ve found.

retire in Hawaii

1) Hawaii. Hawaii is great if you have money or you don’t have responsibilities. The weather is perfect, the people are cool, the culture is laid back and healthy – on the downside – it costs a lot to live in Hawaii. I loved living there as a single guy with no responsibilities, but I just can’t make it there with a family to support.

Morocco Retirement

2) Morocco. I’ve complained about it, but Morocco has a lot going for it. The food and rent are cheap and pretty good, the people are interesting and kind. The country is amazingly varied with the Atlantic, the Mediterranean, the Sahara, the Atlas Mountains, and astoundingly exotic cities and towns. On the downside, the religious nature of Morocco can be kind of a bummer. Still, where else can you buy a palace for $50k?

Turkey Retirement

3) Turkey. Beautiful country with fabulous beaches and mind blowing history. Great food, incredibly kind people, exotic culture, and open minded and progressive enough to satisfy anyone. On the downside – war in Syria next door and an increasingly religious oriented government that is curbing in freedom of thought and making things harder for the expat retirees who live there.

Retire on Oregon Coast

4). Reedsport, Oregon. I think my wife and I might be the only people in this town under the age of 65. Cheap, close to the coast, great beaches, abundant hiking and wild life, safe, and so far, the weather is fantastic. On the downside – we are the only people under 65 it seems and in terms of food and culture – there really isn’t any outside of our house.  Still, where else in America can you get a 3 bedroom house with a big yard, a garage and have access to a dozen lakes, beaches, three rivers, and more within ten minutes for less than $1000 – or if you have an RV for less than $300 per month?

What about you? What’s your favorite retirement city? Where do you want to retire to? What hidden gems do you love?

 

Turkish residence permit tea

Getting Foreign Resident Permits in Morocco and Turkey

Traveling around the world in the slowest possible way means that I generally stay longer in a country than a tourist visa allows.

What that means is that I either have to be illegal or get a foreign resident permit. The difference in requirements and bureaucracy can be staggering. I won’t go into what it takes to stay in countries like the USA if you are a non-citizen, but the two countries I’ve most recently called home offer a startling contrast to one another.

Morocco Foreign Resident Permit

Getting my foreign resident permit in Morocco (called a carte de sejour) was a monstrous undertaking. I had to provide the following documents:
-ten passport photos
-six copies of my passport
-proof of residence, i.e. a rental contract
-five copies of my birth certificate
-five copies of my proof of employment (work contract)
-a letter from my employer stating that I was in fact working (attestation de travail)
-a police report from my last country of residence
– a 100 dirham stamp
All of the documents had to be certified as original and stamped at the local city hall. The process took six months during which I had to check in at the local police station every month. Total cost was only about 50 Euro. By the time I got it, the permit was only valid for six months of the one year I had applied for.

If you want to travel around the world, start planning your trip now with the Round the World Travel Planner

Turkey Foreign Resident Permit
The process in Turkey was far easier but also much more expensive.

– I had to have a Turkish bank account with 500 lira for each month I planned to stay in Turkey (12 months = 6000 Lira). In order to get the bank account, I had to get a Turkish Tax Identification Card which cost about 700 Euro. I was also asked to prove who my parents were since Turkish ID generally states your parent’s names on it. To get the bank account, I needed just my passport and the tax ID card.

– I needed to have a sponsor who vouched to be responsible for me while I was in Turkey. In this case, me and the 24 year old Turkish man who vouched for me laughed about the fact that a 24 year old man was responsible for a 38 year old man. We had to get a notarized statement.
– I needed to be able to provide an address of residence and phone number to be reached at.
– 5 passport photos
– 2 copies of my birth certificate
– An application for residency
– 900 Lira for the residence card

And finally a trip to the regional police headquarters where there were several visits to different offices for stamps and interviews, during one of which I was served tea and baklava! Turkey is one of the most civilized nations on the planet, this proved it. Two weeks later, they called and I went and picked up my residence permit.

The permit is good until November of next year.

So to summarize: Morocco is cheap but slow and involves numerous bureaucratic hurdles while Turkey is much more expensive but runs efficiently and with a minimum of bureaucracy- not to mention the tea and baklava from the Leftenant!